Writing and Health: Part Deux

Last weeks post about writing was pretty popular, so I decided to do another post about it and some of its benefits. If you missed last weeks’ post you can click on it here:

https://pharmacybrute.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/writing-your-way-to-health/

writeThis won’t be a comprehensive overview of everything beneficial from writing. It is a fascinating thing and I do agree that writing and command of language is a skill that can only benefit everyone that is involved; writing or reading.

In many of the studies that I’ve looked at, the writing performed has been centered around self-expression and dealing with emotions and experiences rather than mundane and the everyday. I find this interesting, as mentioned in the previous post, as it focuses our brains on things that affect us very deeply, rather than external “things” that really matter very little.

One study found that blood pressure was reduced as an effect of expressive writing. [1] Another study assessed blood pressure only right after the writing, and found that it was elevated and mood was more negative. [2] This might be explained by people either reliving events, or just having stress associated with thinking about them. The interesting part is that during follow-up, people reported fewer health center visits. This might be a result of expressing the emotions and getting them out of the system, so to speak, rather than having to deal with them in a clinic setting.

In a study of women, it was found that those with chronic pelvic pain who wrote about the stressful consequences of their pain reported lower pain intensity ratings than women who only wrote about positive events. [3]

PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) is a problem among many people, especially members of the military. During a writing period of just 2 weeks, sufferers of PTSD were asked to write about the trauma or a trivial topic. In both groups “everyone reported less severe PTSD symptoms, impact, and dissociation, and fewer health visits, but about the same suicidal ideation and depression” [4] The trauma group got worse right after writing but were better at the 6 week follow-up. The trivial group was better after and continued to be so at the follow-up.

Another study looking at “traumatic events” found that writing also helped with depression and avoidance behavior. No benefit was found in a “waiting list” group who received no instructions, and who effectively didn’t participate in the trial. [5] It is possible that people with traumatic events in their past simply need to write to receive benefit, with content not so important.

In one interesting study of prison inmates, 3 groups; traumatic writing, trivial writing, and no writing, were assessed pre and post writing assignments. No differences were found between groups with the exception of the traumatic writing and sex offenders. They were found to have decreased infirmary visits than others. [6]

I again reiterate what I said in my last post: WRITE! Write and express thoughts and feelings in a journal. Write a short story too while you’re at it. Look at a writing exercise as just that, an exercise. If that is too much stress, because it sounds like a chore, then write for fun. Exercise is always more productive when you’re having fun doing it, so is writing.

So start a writing club. Try your hand at poetry. Maybe divulge your feelings and emotions concerning things that have happened in the past. Share it with the world or keep it to yourself, but write and enjoy the benefits of learning to command your language.

CIAO

1.Davidson, K., Schwartz, A. R., Sheffield, D., et al (2002) Expressive writing and blood pressure. In The Writing Cure: How Expressive Writing Promotes Health and Emotional Well-being (eds S. J. Lepore & J. M. Smyth), pp. 17–30. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

2.Pennebaker, J. W. & Beall, S. K. (1986) Confronting a traumatic event. Toward an understanding of inhibition and disease. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 95, 274–281.

3.Norman, Sally A., et al. “For whom does it work? Moderators of the effects of written emotional disclosure in a randomized trial among women with chronic pelvic pain.” Psychosomatic Medicine 66.2 (2004): 174-183

4.Deters, Pamela B., and Lillian M. Range. “Does writing reduce posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms?.” Violence and victims 18.5 (2003): 569-580.

5.Schoutrop, Mirjam JA, et al. “Structured writing and processing major stressful events: A controlled trial.” Psychotherapy and psychosomatics 71.3 (2002): 151-157.

6.Richards, Jane M., et al. “Effects of disclosure of traumatic events on illness behavior among psychiatric prison inmates.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology 109.1 (2000): 156.

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